A World of Good Health
A World of Acupuncture A World of Chinese Medicine




aromatherapy articles
History of Aromatherapy
aromatherapy origins
aromatherapy today
Essential Oils Basics
essential oils
extraction methods
Essential Oils Database
essential oils a to z
oils for the mind
oils for the body
The Uses
body & foot bath
aromatic massage
skin and hair care
enhance the air
stress and anxiety
inflammation
alopecia
pain management


Top Ten Essential Oils

Zen Garden Aromatherapy

 

 





 
 
Rediscovery of a Healing Art:

One of the few places where the tradition of Aromatherapy continued was in monasteries, where monks used plants from herbal gardens to produce infused oils, herbal teas and medicines.

At the time of the plague and during the Middle Ages, it was discovered that certain aromatic derivatives helped to prevent the spread of infection, and others, such as cedar and pine, were burnt to fumigate homes and streets.

The revival of the use of essential oils is believed to be credited to a Persian physician and philosopher known as Avicenna who lived from 980 AD to 1037 AD. The Arabs initiated a method of extraction known as distillation, and study of the therapeutic use of plants once again became popular in the Universities. The knowledge of distillation spread to their invading forces during the Crusades, and the lost process was once again returned to Europe.

By 1200 AD, essential oils were being produced in Germany and were based mainly on herbs and spices brought from Africa and the Far East.

When South America was invaded by the conquistadors, even more medicinal plants and aromatic oils were discovered, and the wide variety of medicinal plants found in Montezuma's gardens provided a basis for many new and important remedies and treatments.

Throughout the northern continent, Native American Indians were using aromatic oils and producing their own herbal remedies which were discovered when settlers began to make their way across the plains of the New World.

Although herbs and aromatics had been used in other world cultures for many centuries, it was not until the 19th century that scientists in Europe and Great Britain began researching the effects of essential oils on humans. It was French chemist, Rene Maurice Gattefosse who discovered the healing powers of lavender oil after burning his hand in his laboratory. He published a book on the anti-microbial effects of the oils in 1937 and the term "Aromatherapy" was born.

 

 

back to top next> Aromatherapy Today

 
 


Home | Essential Oils A to Z | Top Ten Essential Oils | Aromatherapy Shops
Glossary of Terms | Advertise with us | Add your store | Link to us

2001-2009 A World of Aromatherapy - All Rights Reserved

The information provided on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice. Should you have any serious health concerns, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering any natural remedy.